WHO Collaborating Centre Fellows

Rima Afifi

Rima Afifi, Ph.D., MPH, CHES

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Education of the Faculty of Health Sciences, at the American University of Beirut (www.aub.edu.lb).

I have a PhD in Health Services Research, an MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education, and a B.S. in Psychology. I have lived most of my life in Lebanon, but spend about 15 years in total in the United States. I have an interesting cultural background in that I am part Palestinian, and part American, having lived in Beirut and the US for the majority of my life.

I am committed to advancing health through engaging communities, and specifically focus my efforts on the Eastern Mediterranean region of the World.

Research Interests:

My research interests are in community-based participatory research and in evaluation. My topical interests are in youth health/health behavior, and tobacco use.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

My interest in Community-Based Participatory Research projects began during my MPH training at UNC-CH School of Public Health. I then moved on to become the SAFE KIDS coordinator for Dekalb County, Georgia which involved initiating a community-based violence prevention project. As I moved on to complete by PhD at St. Louis U SPH, the interest and opportunity to engage in community work continued. Since returning to Lebanon, I have coordinated or co-coordinated two large scale community-based research projects, the first around cardiovascular disease prevention in a neighborhood of Beirut, and the most recent a youth mental health promotion project in a Palestinian refugee camp.

I am committed to community-based participatory work because I believe it leads to lasting change by engaging community members in decisions and choices about the ways they would like to live and work. I also feel that it is a two-way learning process between “academicians” and “community members” where each equally contribute their expert knowledge. Community-based partnerships bring together the best of research and practice “evidence”. I believe in the saying: “if we want more evidence-based practice, then we need more practice-based evidence.” (http://www.lgreen.net/authors/lwgreen.htm)

Description of the work I am engaged in:

The Youth Working Group at the Faculty of Health Sciences at the American University of Beirut is currently engaged in a community-based participatory research project with one of the Palestinian refugee Camps in Beirut. The project aims to improve mental well being, increase attachment to schools, and enhance civic engagement of young people (aged 11-13 years, as well as 14+). The project has been funded by the Wellcome Trust of the UK and the intervention components include activities for the youth, their parents, and their teachers. The project, from its inception, has been guided and planned by a community youth coalition which has included youth, off and on.

We are engaged in a partnership with the KU Work Group for Community Health and Development http://communityhealth.ku.edu , and specifically, for this project, will be using the Community Check Box of the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/) to monitor activities and facilitate evaluation and sense making.


Mary Amuyunzu-Nyamongo

Mary Amuyunzu-Nyamongo, Ph.D.

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am the Executive Director of the African Institute for Health & Development (AIHD) based in Nairobi, Kenya. I coordinate health promotion activities in the region as part of the global initiatives of the International Union for Health Promotion & Education (IUHPE). I am also the Coordinator of the newly founded Consortium for Non-Communicable Diseases Prevention and Control in sub-Saharan Africa (CNCD-Africa). I am a Senior Fellow with the Synergos Institute and a member of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) Technical Consultative Committee (TCC) and of the Community Directed Interventions of WHO-TDR. I hold a PhD in Anthropology (1994) from the University of Cambridge, UK.

Research Interests:

My research interests span a wide range of health and development issues. She is currently working on community-based monitoring systems (as an empowerment tool for communities), non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, Social Protection and urban poverty. I also conduct research on women’s health, child health and HIV/AIDS, which are major development issues.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

The work we are doing with communities fits well with the community tool box on which we are collaborating with the University of Kansas. My interest on social issues is based on my training as an anthropologist, and experience in communities where poverty defines the health outcomes and future of the people. The approach we have adopted in our work is one that attests to the fact that children born in poor households do not necessary have to die poor. I also know that communities have resources and a voice that could lead to the improvement of their health and well-being.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

I am currently engaged in programme and research activities mainly focusing on: (i) community empowerment through production and provision of evidence on viable solutions; (2) non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa; (3) capacity building for urban poor women through recycling plastic bags for health and economic empowerment; (4) increasing access to water and sanitation. The activities I am currently engaged in require evidence of effectiveness and advocacy at the community and national levels.


Jeffrey Colvin

Jeffrey Colvin, MD, JD

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am an assistant professor of pediatrics at Children's Mercy Hospital and the University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Medicine. I have an undergraduate degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins University. I earned a medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia and a law degree from Columbia University in New York. I completed my pediatric residency training at Children's Hospital Boston and Boston Medical Center. I specialize in the care of hospitalized children.

Research Interests:

I am interested in understanding the impact of social determinants on child health. In particular, I hope to learn how changes facilitated by communities can alter those social determinants and improve the lives of children.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

While an undergraduate and graduate student, I became very aware of the importance of translating research on the social determinants of health into real world, practical action for low income communities. It is not enough to simply identify the source of disease; physicians need to assist communities in improving those root causes of poor health and to improve their lives. During my training, I also learned that most important public health action in communities was not undertaken by physicians or researchers. Rather, the most important work is being undertaken by neighborhood residents, working together to improve their communities. I became very interested in learning how community residents could become more effective in facilitating community change to improve health.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

Beyond caring for hospitalized children, I am the medical advisor to the medical-legal partnership at Children's Mercy Hospital. Medical-legal partnerships join public interest attorneys with physicians, social workers, and patients in the health care setting to remedy social determinants of health through legal means. By working with public interest attorneys, physicians can address problems that impact a patient's health but that are beyond the scope of medicine, such as poverty, poor housing conditions, food insecurity, and immigration status. Through collaboration with the KU Work Group, we are evaluating the health impact of medical-legal partnerships and are examining how these partnerships create change within the health care community to better address the social determinants of health.


Photo of Julian Fisher.Julian Fisher

Background and Professional Interests

An experienced policy advisor and researcher based in both Germany (Hannover) and Switzerland (Geneva). Special focus; i. global health advocacy, ii. health policy and systems research and iii. health workforce education.

Work experience in a diverse range of professional environments and geographical locations, covering Europe, Tanzania, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Falkland Islands and Antarctica within various sectors and organizations, including international public health policy and advocacy, health profession (federation) management, undergraduate and post graduate education, both classroom and web based.

 

Currently a member of:

  1. World Health Organization Technical Advisory Group for the National Health Workforce Accounts;
  2. World Health Organization steering committee and co-ordinating editor, curator and developer of WHO eBook on the Social Determinants of Health;
  3. WHO Steering Committee for Promoting and Adapting Health in All Policies Trainings;
  4. WHO Technical Working Group (TWG) for health workforce assessment tools.

Research Interests

  1. Lifelong learning systems / professional, technical and vocational education
  2. Adapting Health in all policies training for health workforce education and training
  3. Integrating social determinants into health workforce education and training
  4. Elearning and use of social media in health workforce education

Recent publications and reports:

Description of main areas of work:

  1. Through partnerships and cooperation, including the WHO Global Health Workforce Network, support the implementation of immediate actions of the High Level Commission of Health Employment and Economic Growth, with a focus on;
    1. research on lifelong learning systems (intersectoral planning; SDG 3 SDG 4)
    2. Social accountability framework for professional, vocational technical education;
  2. Health policies and systems research; policy implementation dialogue through transformative health workforce education website (www.whoeducationguidelines.org) and its digitial media strategy as part of implementation of 2013 WHO resolution 66.23 ’Transforming health workforce education in support of Universal Health Coverage’
  3. Production and roll out of WHO eBook on the social determinants of health, including regional workshops
  4. Agile development of WHO UNICEF eBook on Nutrition

Cesareo Fernandez GomezCesareo Fernandez Gomez, Ph.D

Background and Professional Interests:

I am Director of CIDECOT Community Development S.L. I have a graduate degree in Organizational Psychology and Clinical Psychology. I earned a Master degree in Public Health (Addictions) at the University of Deusto (Spain), and a PhD in Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). From 2006 to 2011, I have been a post-doctoral researcher and a visiting scholar with the Work Group for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas. I am also studying Political Science, Philosophy, Clinical Psychology and Theology. I specialize in clinical and community psychology, with a special emphasis on community health and development in rural areas of Latin America, Spain, and other European countries. 

Research Interests:

I am especially interested in evaluative research on public health, mental health, substance abuse, vulnerable populations such as children and elderly, as well as in community-based participatory research on how community action and changes can promote integral and sustainable development and health in rural communities.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

After approximately 20 years of managing research and training programs on public health and clinical and community psychology at a national (Spain) and European level, my colleagues and I understood that community risk, protective factors, and determinants for community health and development were becoming increasingly relevant for explaining public health and development issues, and they were receiving less attention than needed in public policies concerning them. Most public health and development policies and practices have been planned and implemented at a program level, but they were not attaining the expected impact and outcomes. Furthermore, European Commission and national governments from European Countries were demanding more active and responsible participation from civil society in those efforts, while civil society demanded an increased ability to actively participate in designing and planning those public policies, practices and programs. These processes have been consolidating in Europe, and actually there is a clear need to make sure that democracy becomes really participative and focused on community needs and resources. These are the main reasons why from 2006 until today I engaged in translating the Community Tool Box into Spanish, adapting it to Spanish-speaking populations, and enhancing its evidence base in these contexts.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

After my return from this KUWG on 2011, I have begun managing community health and development programs in rural settings in my homeland in the Cantabric Area, northwest Spain, and I am also engaged in similar efforts in other European countries, building a collaborative research team focused on these issues. Furthermore, I am also collaborating with the KUWG in similar initiatives in Latin American countries such as Columbia and Venezuela. I look forward to expanding the collaborative research network in Latin America. My community approach entails engaging a broad participation from civil society actors such as individuals, families, neighborhood associations, other NGOs, universities, business, public institutions, and churches in order to deal with community development and health issues.


Yo Jackson, PhD., ABPP

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am currently an Associate Professor in the Clinical Child Psychology Program, joint appointed in the Departments of Psychology and Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas.

Research Interests:

My research interests are in trauma and stress in youth and the development of resilience. I am particularly interested in child maltreatment and interventions that address treatment and prevention and the mechanisms of behavior change. I am also interested in culture and how culture influences parenting practices and mental health in youth.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

My interest in the development of resilience came from my work as a clinical child psychologist. I noticed that when a group of children were exposed to the same trauma, often there would be a few who seemed to recover quickly and show little no negative effects. I wanted to better understand the mechanisms that were at work in the development of adaptive functioning and how we as a field might be able to develop interventions that utilized the most effective predictors of recovery.

My interest in culture stems from my own background as a bi-racial person. Growing up with two cultures in my own family, I saw how cultural practices operate to influence the mental health of children. My professional work has been primarily focused on parenting practices and parental perceptions of child-rearing and child behavior that stem from cultural beliefs.

Given that the majority of mental illnesses begin in childhood, I think understanding how children demonstrate resilience is important for the development of lifelong health. It is critical that we develop interventions that begin with a focus on translation to other cultures and adaptation to myriad of settings. If we want to bridge the gap between research and practice, it is key that we think about intervention in the broadest sense possible and find ways for communities and the greater population to be served by the products of our work.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

One of the projects I am working on is identifying how protective factors and risk operate to predict mental health in youth exposed to child maltreatment. The project aims to target children in state custody and track their well-being over the course of four years. The outcome of the project will be an empirically-derived model of the process of resilience and will help to inform the field on stress in childhood as to how protective factors operate (i.e., in what amount, under what conditions) to help children recover from major life events.

I am also working on developing a better understanding of the community of parents and how we as a field might better reach parents who have children at little or those at great risk for child psychological problems. To this end, we are working on establishing how parenting programs need to be adapted to reach the broadest audience possible so that we can scale-up interventions to a population level.


Robert Bella Kuganab-lemRobert Bella Kuganab-lem, Ph.D.

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am the Developer and Director of the Master of Community Health and Development programme. The programme is based in the School of Medicine and Health Science at the University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.

I have a PhD in Health Planning and Management and have been a Senior Lecturer in the School of Medicine and Health Science for the past fourteen years. I am a Public Health Services Consultant to several local and international non-governmental organizations.

My University is a pro poor university and I am well motivated in advocating for equity and access to health care for poor and underserved communities. My core orientation is to train health human resource and equally advocate for quality public health services for the three underserved northern regions of Ghana in the hope of reducing health inequalities.

Research Interests:

My research interests cuts across critical areas of public health. It includes financial access, rural health systems development, community engagement and empowerment, community health monitoring systems,  Maternal and Child Health, mental health care integration, capacity building of health care providers and motivation for rural service.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work:

What motivates me is getting the classroom into the community. As a human resource developer I feel strongly that if we are to be relevant to our communities, then we have to decent from the ivory tower and engage our communities as we train and actively find solutions to the challenges confronting our communities. The community tool box offers this unique opportunity to work with the community in the training of health professionals who will not feel inadequate to work with communities to surmount their problems. The community tool box makes it possible for the graduate to immerse herself and “putting it all together” in the quest to have healthy people in healthy communities. The tool makes community work pleasant. It produces results that are tangible and sustainable.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

I am currently the Director for the MSc/MPhil Community Health and Development Programme in the University for Development Studies Tamale. I am working to further develop the community engagement component of this programme which includes working on an African Version of the Community Tool Box curriculum. I must admit that the Community Tool Box is relevant in any context and giving it an African touch is simply putting in problems and examples that can provoke discussions for initiating community action plans and interventions.


Issahaku MastaphaIssahaku Mustapha

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am a public health practitioner with a specialty in Health Education and Promotion, which I teach in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences in the University for Development Studies, Ghana. I have been coordinating the UDS Third Trimester Field Practical Training Program (www.uds.edu.gh) in the Talensi – Nabdam district and the clinical students Community Medicine Posting, my experience in field coordination work for Health and community development, both for academic and field research are in the areas of sanitation Hygiene and population health.

In the UDS Medical School Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach to medical education, I am a member of the Community Based Experience and Service (COBES) committee, Coordinator of the Public Health Block in the preclinical years and coordinator for Field Practical training in Environmental and Occupational Health for clinical rotations in Community Health.

Research Interest:

My research interest is informed by the ground assessment of preventable diseases of public dimension in sub Saharan Africa ranging from issues on Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene, control of infectious and non infectious diseases, Maternal and Child Health. I am working on the following areas;

  • Promoting Ecological Sanitation as a livelihood and organic Food Security Strategy in Northern Ghana.
  • Assessing the Public Health Implications of the burial Practices of the undertakers in Northern Ghana.
  • Traditional approach to Maternal and Child health care in northern Ghana .Its ramifications for the attainment of MDGs 4 & 5
  • School health

Why I chose to engage in this work/How I came to engage in this work:

The Problem Based Learning approach to medical education is akin to the Community Tools Box approach which we have adapted from the University of Kansas for use in our MSc in Community Health and Development program. This fits well for my engagement with poor communities as a Health Promoter.

Description of the work I am in:

The water and sanitation challenges facing Ghana  now  is how to provide sanitation facilities that saves water, protects water, improves the soil and can enhance food and water security .

I am currently sensitizing and creating awareness of communities about ecological sanitation (Reuse concept) which is a sustainable sanitation option for low-income communities and which will contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals  7 (MDGs) environmental  sustainability and related fields such as reducing poverty and hunger, reducing child mortality, improving lives of slum dwellers and ensuring environmental sustainability.


Edwin Penaherrera

Edwin Penaherrera

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Health and Social Sciences of the Faculty of Public Health Sciences, at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, UPCH (www.upch.edu.pe), a professor of the Faculty of Psychology at the Universidad de Lima, at Peru, South America (www.ulima.edu.pe ).

Moreover I am currently a candidate of a Doctoral degree in psychology at Universidad San Martin de Porres in Lima (www.usmp.edu.pe). I have both an MPH and a master in science of Health Promotion studied at Brunel University at London, UK and also a B.S. in Psychology. I have extensive experience with drug abuse prevention and community-based programmes, especially those focused on youth empowerment and social capital improvement.

During the last few years I have been committed to several health promotion community-based initiatives, giving technical advice to the Ministry of Health and NGOs in order to systematize and evaluate its processes. I am now working with Pathfinder International, collaborating with their Global Fund in the reinforcement of preventive and health promotion actions against the Tuberculosis in my country.

Research Interests:

My research interests are in community-based participatory research, particularly with a health promotion focus, evaluation, and systematization processes. In our country there are important community-based initiatives, but there are few of them published. Improvement of evaluation methodology of community processes as community management, political incidence, social capital and empowerment are some topics of my interests. Moreover, I am also interested in qualitative research to allow me to understand social and subjective aspects behind behaviors, such as beliefs, values and cultural characteristics. I am also interested in evaluation of health promotion processes.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

My interest in Community-Based Participatory Research projects began at the beginning of my career when I developed drug abuse preventive programmes in school and municipality settings. The activism of all the social actors was relevant, but their efforts lacked use of evaluation methodology, so it was difficult to show the effects of their intervention. On the other hand, as a Director of Health Promotion at the Ministry of Health I came into contact with numerous and valuable community-based experiences existing in our country, but again, because of the lack of evaluation it wasn´t possible to show effects and social changes as an evidence of positive experiences.

The importance of supportive social and health policies was another highlighted topic. During a workshop organized by PAHO and IUHPE I had the opportunity to meet the Kansas University Community Tool Box team and they have engaged me in projects of mutual interest. During that last few years I was involved in the systematization of two community based experiences developed in my country, one from a government side and other from a private NGO. Both of them focused in drug abuse and the importance of promoting healthy environments and healthy lifestyles. These experiences, based on social capital and empowerment-building, reinforce the ideas I have in regard to the need to develop in-depth research and evaluation processes. Participatory processes decrease the gap between academic and lay knowledge/common sense; both necessary to build community processes which guarantee sustainability. Otherwise, community will expect that the professionals are the only social actors responsible for the construction of better life conditions.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

As a professor at the undergraduate level, I introduce my students in the project design and evaluation processes, particularly in community-based projects. At a postgraduate level, I encourage my students (most of them policy makers) to set up a technical and political agenda focusing in community-based health promotion projects, emphasizing that it is a must to improve participatory diagnosis and evaluation processes. This year, 2010, as a member of Pathfinder International, I become involved in the Eight Round of the Global Fund Program, focused on the reinforcement of preventive and health promotion strategies to fight against tuberculosis (TB) in my country.


Florence DiGennaro ReedFlorence D. DiGennaro Reed, PhD, BCBA-D

Fellow, World Health Organizational Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am currently an Associate Professor in and Chairperson of the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas. I am a licensed behavior analyst in the state of Kansas and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.  I received a bachelor's degree in psychology from Binghamton University, a master's degree in experimental psychology from Long Island University, and a doctorate in school psychology from Syracuse University. I also completed a clinical post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute for Child Development and a pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at the May Center for Education and Neurorehabilitation and the May Center for Child Development.

 

Research Interests:

My research interests primarily involve organizational behavior management. I am particularly interested in working at the organizational or staff level to improve the quality of services provided to individuals in need of support. As such, a majority of my work is conducted in a behavioral consultation model with non-profit service delivery organizations.

My work with the Collaborating Centre has involved assisting colleagues with documenting Ebola response efforts as well as developing standardized protocols for the KU Work Group’s consultation efforts.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

My interest in organizational behavior management stemmed from my work as a behavior analyst. I noticed that educators did not adopt best-practice training approaches, which influenced the outcomes of service recipients in desperate need of support. Sadly, I also observed that consultants failed to reliably implement best-practice training procedures when working with educators. Over time my research has evolved to incorporate developing resource-efficient and effective practices to support the efforts of interventionists, more broadly.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

I am currently engaged in applied research and consultation as well laboratory research. My team’s applied research and consultation mainly focuses on developing staff training procedures for local non-profits, presenting monthly performance scorecard data on various quality assurance metrics, tracking the effectiveness of staff incentive programs, and other organizational-level efforts. Our translational research involves using a behavioral economic framework to understand employee behavior.


Michael C. Roberts

Michael C. Roberts, Ph.D., ABPP

Fellow, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre

Background and Professional Interests:

I am Professor and Director of the Clinical Child Psychology Program at the University of Kansas. I graduated from Purdue University in clinical psychology with a specialization in clinical child psychology and interned at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma Children’s Memorial Hospital). Prior to the last 17 years at the University of Kansas, I was on the faculty of the University of Alabama.

Research Interests:

A significant initiative for the next several years will be working with the World Health Organziation on the revision of the Mental and Behavioural Disorders chapter of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). This work, in particular, will help develop a taxonomy of mental and behavioral disorders for children and adolescents and definitional criteria for clinical and research purposes. My research team is reviewing and synthesizing relevant scientific literature on childhood and adolescent psychological (mental) disorders. The ICD revision will include designing, conducting, and analyzing data collected in field trials. This taxonomy of physical and mental disorders is the most widely accepted system and is used internationally to classify human health conditions in a coding system and set definitional criteria for clinical and research purposes. In addition to this work with the WHO on the ICD revision, my ongoing research activities have been focused on general issues in clinical child and pediatric psychology, psychotherapeutic outcomes, program evaluation, and professional issues, including ethics and training. Previously and with some continuing projects, this work has focused on prevention, especially injury control. More specific areas of work include:

  • children's and parents' perceptions of pediatric and psychological conditions and treatments; treatment adherence issues;
  • program evaluation and mental health service delivery (psychotherapeutic outcomes);
  • positive psychology and children's development, especially hope and benefit finding
  • prevention of injuries in children and health promotion;
  • effects of traumatic effects and mitigation of problems following natural and human made disasters (stress, coping, and resilience), including interpersonal violence.

My publication list includes close to 200 journal articles, book chapters, and books revolving around the application of psychology to understanding and influencing children’s physical and mental health.

Why I chose to be engaged in this work/How I came to be engaged in this work:

I firmly believe in the scientist-practitioner orientation to approaching development and problems of childhood. This orientation requires an empirical research perspective focusing on the real world situations of children and adolescents, including their positive development and problems affecting both psychological and physical health. This approach has guided my research and professional activities in ways that I could not have envisioned during my graduate training or early career. It has been an invigorating life of learning, discovery, and, I hope, contributions to the health and well-being of children and their families.

Description of the work I am engaged in:

I have an eclectic research team of graduate and undergraduate students with a diversity of interests. We have current projects on such phenomena as peanut allergies and family adjustment; meta-analyses of adherence to medication regimens for acute and chronic illnesses; family conflict, community violence, and adolescents’ depressive symptoms; acceptability of weight loss interventions; social support and family stress; program evaluations of family medicine and outpatient pediatric clinics; evaluations of summer camps for children with sickle cell disease and cancer and a dance camp for inner city at risk for developing psychosocial problems. The work with the WHO and the revision of the International Classification of Diseases represents an opportunity to participate in a larger domain and involve students in the scientific data underlying the diagnostic codes and implementation of the ICD in multiple settings in clinical settings, research investigations, teaching and training of professionals, and public health activities. More information on our work can be found at on the website of the Clinical Child Psychology Program: http://www2.ku.edu/~clchild/faculty/roberts.shtml


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